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Martian_AnkhV_VerySMWhere will you go when you die? The answer may surprise you. Read SECOND EDEN 

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FRIGHT FLIGHT™   (Aviation Safety: Selected NTSB Accidents Probes)

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   Military Vets Looking for a Job?

This most interesting piece is of unknown authorship. It came to our attention by email, ten times removed--you know how these things get passed around, Fwd To:, Fwd To:, ad infinitum.

Anyhow, I’d be happy to give attribution if I could. Nonetheless, we think you’ll be surprised by the unusual connection--albeit tangential--to the space program. Enjoy!--Ed.

 

The more things change...

Does the statement, "We've always done it that way" ring any bells? Well, consider this:

The US standard railroad gauge (distance between the rails) is 4 feet, 8.5 inches. That's an exceedingly odd number, don’t you think? Why was that gauge used? 

Because that's the way they built them in England, and English expatriates built the US Railroads.

Why did the English build them like that?

Because the first rail lines were built by the same people who built the pre-railroad tramways, and that's the gauge they used. 

Why did "they" use that gauge then? 

Because the people who built the tramways used the same jigs and tools that they used for building wagons, which used that wheel spacing.

Okay! Why did the wagons have that particular odd wheel spacing?

Well, if they tried to use any other spacing, the wagon wheels would break on some of the old, long distance roads in England, because that's the spacing of the wheel ruts. 

So who built those old rutted roads?

Imperial Rome built the first long distance roads in Europe (and England) for their legions. The roads have been used ever since. 

And the ruts in the roads?

Roman war chariots formed the initial ruts, which everyone else had to match for fear of destroying their wagon wheels. Since the chariots were made for Imperial Rome, they were all alike in the matter of wheel spacing.

The United States standard railroad gauge of 4 feet, 8.5 inches is derived from the original specifications for an Imperial Roman war chariot. Only proving that bureaucracies--and diamonds--are forever. 

So the next time you are handed a specification and wonder what horse's ass came up with it, you may be exactly right, because the Imperial Roman war chariots were made just wide enough to accommodate the back ends of two war horses.

 Now here’s a most peculiar twist to this story...

When you see a Space Shuttle sitting on its launch pad, there are two big booster rockets attached to the sides of the main fuel tank. These are solid rocket boosters, or SRBs, and they are made by Thiokol at their factory in Utah.

The engineers who designed the SRBs would have preferred to make them a bit fatter, but the SRBs had to be shipped by train from the factory to the launch site, and low and behold, the railroad  line from the factory happens to run through a tunnel that goes right smack through a mountain. The SRBs had to fit through that tunnel.

Now it turned out that the tunnel is slightly wider than the railroad track, and the railroad track, as you now know, is about as wide as two horses' behinds. 

So, a major Space Shuttle design feature of what is arguably the world's most advanced transportation system was determined over two thousand years ago by the width of two horse's behinds. Go figure....

Back to Space and Astronautics

 

It’s true...

 The Universe started with the Big Bang.

The_Big_BangSM

And the Big Bang came from a singularity.

But just what, exactly, is a singularity?

The surprising answer is mind-blowingly simple.

And enormously transformative.

It is, in fact, the ultimate proof of God.

Read

The Bigger Bang

 

What’s New?

Norman Rockwell’s

  Man’s First Step on the Moon Fine Art Print.

mom3

Or Buy One Now...While they last!

Celebrate Mankindīs Greatest Adventure: Manīs First Step on the Moon, July 20, 1969, with Norman Rockwellīs limited edition print. Publisherīs Closeout! While they last. Only $75? Plus $14.95 shipping (flat) & insur.

Click for Details!

Bush sm

Lt (j.g.) George H. W. Bush Flying a Grumman TBM Avenger 1943, by renowned artist Ted Wilbur

Publisher’s Closeout! This fabulous collector edition print is available now for a limited time at the special online price of ONLY $50.00 Plus $14.95 shipping (flat) & insur. ($64.95 total Order.

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